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Showing posts from May 8, 2011

The Holy Ghost

[The Holy Ghost] quickens all the intellectual faculties, increases, enlarges, expands and purifies all the natural passions and affections; and adapts them, by the gift of wisdom, to their lawful use. It inspires, develops, cultivates and matures all the fine-toned sympathies, joys, tastes, kindred feelings and affections of our nature. It inspires virtue, kindness, goodness, tenderness, gentleness and charity. It develops beauty of person, form and features. It tends to health, vigor, animation and social feeling. It develops and invigorates all the faculties of the physical and intellectual man. It strengthens, invigorates, and gives tone to the nerves. In short, it is, as it were, marrow to the bone, joy to the heart, light to the eyes, music to the ears, and life to the whole being.


Parley P. Pratt, Key to the Science of Theology (Liverpool: F. D. Richards; London: Latter-day Saints’ Book Depot, 1855), 98–99; spelling modernized.

The Valiant Will Be Exalted

"There are . . . many members of the Church who are lax and careless and who continually procrastinate. They live the gospel casually but not devoutly. They have complied with some requirements but are not valiant. They do no major crime but merely fail to do the things required—things like paying tithing, living the Word of Wisdom, having family prayers, fasting, attending meetings, serving. . . . ". . . The Lord will not translate one's good hopes and desires and intentions into works. Each of us must do that for himself. . . . "Only the valiant will be exalted and receive the highest degree of glory, hence 'many are called, but few are chosen.' (D&C 121:40.) As the Savior put it, '. . . strait is the gate, and narrow the way, which leadeth unto life, and few there be that find it.' And conversely, '. . . wide is the gate, and broad is the way, that leadeth to destruction, and many there be which go in thereat.' (Matt. 7:13, 14.)"

A Price Worth Paying

The word for disciple and the word for discipline both come from the same Latin root--discipulus, which means pupil. . . . What is discipleship? It is primarily obedience to the Savior. Discipleship includes many things. It is chastity. It is tithing. It is family home evening. It is keeping all the commandments. It is forsaking anything that is not good for us. Everything in life has a price. Considering the Savior's great promise for peace in this life and eternal life in the life to come, discipleship is a price worth paying. It is a price we cannot afford not to pay. By measure, the requirements of discipleship are much, much less than the promised blessings.

James E. Faust, "Discipleship," Ensign, Nov. 2006, 20