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the costs and rewards of discipleship (Brigham Young)


There is a class of persons that persecution will not drive from the Church of Christ, but prosperity will; and again, there is another class that prosperity will not drive, but persecution will. The Lord must and will have a company of Saints who will follow Him to the cross, if it be necessary; and these He will crown. They are the ones who will wear a celestial crown and have dominion, rule, and government. These are they who will receive honor of the Father, with glory, exaltation, and eternal lives. They shall reign over kingdoms, and have power to be Gods, even the sons of God.
Those other classes will take different stations and possess inferior glories, according to their works in the flesh. That class who will altogether serve the world and disregard the cause of truth will become servants to the sons of God and be in servitude throughout eternity.
What shall we do? I say, Cleave to “Mormonism,” work with all our might for the Lord, and love Him better than any other earthly or heavenly object. And if He requires us to sacrifice our houses, our horses, our cattle, our wives, and our children, let them remain upon the altar; but let us follow Him to salvation and eternal life.
Brigham Young, Journal of Discourses 6:322

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